NVIDIA News Archives
NVIDIA's OpenGL 3.0 Linux Driver?

Last week OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.30 were released during SIGGRAPH 2008. In that article we expected NVIDIA would be first to provide an OpenGL 3.0 driver due to NVIDIA's involvement with the Khronos Group and their much rumored "Big Bang II" project, but we had no official comment from them at the time of publishing. Though we now have a response from NVIDIA.

18 August 2008 - When PR Mixes With Developers... - 6 Comments
NVIDIA Launches 9500GT ($100) GPU

While NVIDIA's newest GPU family is the GTX 200 series, they aren't yet introducing the GTX low-end models but are continuing to mature the GeForce 9 arsenal. Introduced this morning by NVIDIA Corporation was the GeForce 9500GT, which is a sub-$100 product.

29 July 2008 - New Budget GPU Out From NVIDIA - 2 Comments
NVIDIA Updates Its Legacy Linux Drivers

If you're using an older NVIDIA graphics card and haven't yet turned to the reverse-engineered Nouveau driver, you may want to check out the latest NVIDIA legacy drivers. NVIDIA has updated its two oldest legacy drivers -- the 71.xx.xx and 96.xx.xx series -- for Linux. The new 71.86.06 driver for Linux fixes a bug that resulted in black-and-white video output on secondary TVs. The other new driver, 96.43.07, has this TV fix too along with improved nvidia-xconfig parsing when using a xorg.conf file that lacks a module section. Both of these new drivers also have support for the Linux 2.6.26 kernel. The NVIDIA 71.86.06 and 96.43.07 Linux drivers can be downloaded from here and here, respectively.

17 July 2008 - Two New Legacy Drivers From NVIDIA - Add A Comment
NVIDIA Makes A Trivial OSS Driver Update

It's been seven weeks since the obfuscated xf86-video-nv driver was last updated, so this afternoon NVIDIA's Aaron Plattner decided to release version 2.1.10, which will be in time for X.Org 7.4. However, before getting excited that they may actually be doing something good with this open-source driver, it continues to be limited to 2D acceleration and of limited use to someone that just laid down several hundred dollars for a graphics card or two.

30 June 2008 - Nothing To Get Excited Over... - 4 Comments
NVIDIA Denies Opening Up Its Driver

Yesterday we reported on the Linux Foundation's message they have issued on the behalf of more than 140 kernel developers: Binary-only kernel modules are harmful and undesirable. While no vendor was singled out in this message, the biggest hardware manufacturer that has yet to provide any real level of open-source support is NVIDIA Corporation.

24 June 2008 - NVIDIA Fends Off Attacks From Developers - 90 Comments
NVIDIA 173.14.09 / 177.13 Driver

NVIDIA has released the 173.14.09 binary display driver. However, support for the GeForce GTX 200 series is not part of the change-log, unfortunately. This driver is just a bug-fix release for the recently released 173.14.05. Though this driver does have the following fixes: aliased font rendering corruption on X.Org Server 1.5, display corruption problem driving two dual-link DFPs with the Quadro FX 1700, a regression that prevented the X driver from starting on some GeForce FX/6/7 series, and fixing a locale-interaction issue in the nvidia-settings parser. In addition, this release also has preliminary support for the Linux 2.6.26 kernel. To download the x86 and x86_64 NVIDIA Linux drivers, click here and here, respectively.

17 June 2008 - No GeForce GTX 200 Support For Linux - 15 Comments
2D-Only Open-Source GTX 260/280 Support

This morning NVIDIA had unveiled the GeForce GTX 200 series and already NVIDIA's Aaron Plattner has committed support for these cards to the open-source xf86-video-nv driver. This support just involved adding in two new PCI IDs for the GeForce GTX 260 and GTX 280. No other work was needed, since of course this driver is limited to mode-setting and 2D acceleration. Though if you've just shelled out $399 or $649 on a graphics card, changes are you will want to stay clear of this obfuscated driver. If you want to check out this driver, you'll need to obtain it from git on FreeDesktop.org.

16 June 2008 - NVIDIA Updates Its Obfuscated Driver - 3 Comments
NVIDIA Releases GeForce GTX 200 GPUs

As expected, today NVIDIA unveiled their GeForce GTX 200 family of graphics processors. At this time their family is a bit small with only the GeForce GTX 260 and GTX 280 being shown off, but the GTX family should grown soon. These GTX GPUs support CUDA (with PhysX support), second generation NVIDIA unified architecture, 3-way SLI Technology, and PureVideo HD. The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 is made up of 192 processing cores, 576MHz core clock, 999MHz memory clock for its 896MB GDDR3 memory on a 448-bit interface. The fastest GTX processor right now, the GTX 280, has 240 processing cores, 602MHz core clock, 1107MHz memory clock for its 1GB GDDR3 memory on a 512-bit interface. Right now there is no NVIDIA Linux driver to support these next-generation GPUs, but once there is we'll let you know along with providing a performance run-down and other analysis. The GTX 260 costs $399 USD while the GeForce GTX 280 will set you back $649.

16 June 2008 - GeForce GTX 260 and 280 On Linux? - 7 Comments
GeForce 9 Mobile GPUs On Linux

This past week NVIDIA had unveiled the GeForce 9 Mobile GPUs at the Computex Taipei trade-show. The GeForce 9M GPUs were announced just before AMD had rolled out its Puma platform with the fastest ATI mobile graphics ever and the introduction of XGP, which is a PCI Express 2.0 technology for allowing external graphics cards to be used with this new notebook platform.

8 June 2008 - Supported By xf86-video-nv - Add A Comment
NVIDIA Releases GeForce 9 Mobile GPUs

From Computex Taipei, NVIDIA has announced the GeForce 9 Mobile GPUs. NVIDIA claims these next-generation mobile GPUs are 40% faster than their current GeForce 8 mobile processors and 10x faster than IGPs. These low-power GPUs also support PureVideo HD with full support for Blu-ray. When it comes to connectors, these GPUs are designed for NVIDIA's new MXM v3.0 module specification and from the outside they can support DVI, HDMI 1.3, DisplayPort 1.1, and analog VGA connections.

3 June 2008 - Computex Launch: GeForce 9M - Add A Comment
NVIDIA Introduces Tegra Processors

Following the introduction of Intel's Atom MID (Mobile Internet Device) processor family as part of the Menlow platform, VIA had introduced the Nano Processor Family just last week. Today at Computex Taipei, NVIDIA has announced their own mobile processor. NVIDIA's family of mobile processors is called Tegra and is currently made up of the Tegra 650 and Tegra APX 2500, which are planned for use with Windows smart-phones. The Tegra computer-on-a-chip architecture is made up of an 800MHz ARM CPU, HD video processor, and ultra low-power (and low-end) GeForce GPU. More information can be found in the NVIDIA Tegra Press Release.

2 June 2008 - NVIDIA Has Their Own MID CPU - 6 Comments
NVIDIA Releases Gelato Pro For Free

In addition to NVIDIA releasing the 173.14.05 Linux/FreeBSD/Solaris driver this past week, they've made an additional software move. NVIDIA has decided to release Gelato Pro, which previously costed $1,500 USD per node, as now a free download. Gelato Pro is rendering software developed (originally the Blue Moon Rendering Tools and Entropy software before a 2002 acquisition by NVIDIA) that allows for advanced acceleration on NVIDIA (specifically the Quadro series) GPUs. There has been a Gelato non-Pro edition of this software capable of rendering film-quality images that has been available for a free download, but now the professional edition is also free. The caveat for making this free, however, is that NVIDIA no longer plans to maintain the Gelato software. They have discontinued all work on the Gelato software and will be focusing their resources on mental ray software.

2 June 2008 - But At The Same Time Its Left For Dead - 5 Comments
NVIDIA Releases Updated OSS Driver

As a late Friday night release, NVIDIA's Aaron Plattner has announced xf86-video-nv 2.1.9. Back in March the xf86-video-nv 2.1.8 driver was released with initial support for the GeForce 9600GT and today's release improves the G80 support as well as fixing some startup bugs, sorting the supported devices table, adding an option to allow validation of dual-link DVI modes, and a few other minor changes. This announcement can be read on the xorg mailing list.

9 May 2008 - xf86-video-nv 2.1.9 - 1 Comment
OpenTheBlob.com Gets 9,000 Signatures

When OpenTheBlob.com started in late February, within one week of its launch it already had 5,000 signatures and days later it passed the 6,000 and 7,000 marks too. This letter was an open letter to NVIDIA looking for more information on their open-source strategy. While things have slowed down, this past week it crossed the point of having 9,000 signatures!

26 April 2008 - In An Open Letter To NVIDIA Corp - 3 Comments
Fallout From NVIDIA 173.08 Driver

Last week NVIDIA had released the 173.08 display driver for Linux and Solaris operating systems. This driver update had introduced support for new GeForce and Quadro GPUs, experimental X Server 1.5 support, NVIDIA mobile improvements, and a few bug-fixes.

15 April 2008 - Are You Sure You Want To Upgrade? - 38 Comments
NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GX2 On Linux?

Back in January AMD had introduced the Radeon HD 3870 X2 and this morning NVIDIA has counter-attacked them by unleashing the NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GX2. The GeForce 9800 GX2 graphics card is made up of two GeForce G9x 65nm GPUs with each one being clocked at 600MHz and each having 128 stream processors and 512MB of 1GHz GDDR3 memory. These two GPUs are on the same PCB and connected via Scalable Link Interface. Early Windows benchmarks show the NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GX2 slaughtering the Radeon HD 3870 X2, but AMD's dual-GPU offering is priced much lower.

18 March 2008 - New NVIDIA Linux Drivers Soon - Add A Comment
Confidence In An Open NVIDIA Strategy?

Back during CES 2008 we reported that NVIDIA may be plotting an open-source strategy (according to a NVIDIA partner) as the ATI/AMD camp has been on a spree with releasing NDA-free specifications to the OSS community and supporting two open source drivers (Radeon and RadeonHD). Since then, Intel has also joined this open bandwagon by releasing the G965/G35 programming documentation in full (2D, 3D, video, everything) even though they have already have a reliable open-source driver.

15 March 2008 - Will It Be An OSS Fight To The Finish? - 11 Comments
Doing More For An Open NVIDIA

Following the open letter to NVIDIA at OpenTheBlob.com that takes aim at NVIDIA's lack of a reliable open-source driver, now out is a letter geared for NVIDIA's board partners (ASUS, Dell, BFG Tech, etc). This happens to be based off of a strategy I discussed before for frustrated ATI customers prior to the new driver code-base. If you're interested in taking a stand for an open NVIDIA, the page with links and a sample letter can be found here.

12 March 2008 - OpenTheBlob.com At Work Again - 18 Comments
GeForce 9600GT Gets Open "nv" Support

Late last month NVIDIA had unveiled the GeForce 9600GT graphics card as direct competition to the AMD Radeon HD 3850 / 3870. This new PCI Express graphics card still isn't supported by the latest official driver (169.12), but it's been reported to work (at least partially) when using the Tesla 171.05 driver. There is now, however, limited open-source support for this card.

7 March 2008 - If you like the nv driver... - Add A Comment
5,000+ Users For An Open NVIDIA

Just four days ago the OpenTheBlob.com letter to NVIDIA requesting open-source support was published and it already has in excess of 5,000 signatures. Most of these signatures are also accompanied by comments, after hitting the front-pages of Digg and Reddit. Congratulations to the community with 5,000+ signatures in just four days, and hopefully the rumor pans out and NVIDIA will see the mutual benefit in an open-source strategy.

3 March 2008 - The Open Letter To NVIDIA - 7 Comments
Open Letter For Open Drivers To NVIDIA

For those interested in seeing official open-source support from NVIDIA or open specifications, there is an open letter for open drivers to NVIDIA at OpenTheBlob.com. With both AMD and Intel now supporting open-source X.Org drivers and releasing specifications/documentation, the community is looking for the same (if not more) from NVIDIA. Keep in mind, last month we reported at Phoronix that NVIDIA may be developing an open-source strategy. This open letter to NVIDIA (and where you can leave your signature/comments) can be found here.

29 February 2008 - OpenTheBlob.com Takes Aim - 15 Comments
NVIDIA GeForce 9 Linux Driver Available?

This morning NVIDIA has introduced their first GeForce 9 graphics card, with the introduction of the GeForce 9600GT. The NVIDIA GeForce 9600GT isn't the new high-end graphics card, but rather their next-generation mainstream graphics card that is designed to compete with AMD's recent Radeon HD 3850 and 3870. The NVIDIA 9600GT (G94) GPU is built on a 65nm process, 64 stream processors, 650MHz reference core clock, 1800MHz GDDR3 reference memory clock with a 256-bit interface, two dual-link DVI connectors, and is a PCI Express 2.0 part.

21 February 2008 - No NVIDIA G94 Linux Driver, Yet... - 16 Comments
PhysX For CUDA, Linux Support A Given?

Earlier this month it was revealed that NVIDIA Corporation would be buying up AGEIA Technologies, which is the maker of the PhysX SDK and the PhysX PPU (Physics Processing Unit) hardware. That same day we had then asked the question whether is NVIDIA buying AGEIA good for Linux? (The responses.) AGEIA had produced a PhysX software SDK binary for Linux but have never released a Linux driver to enable the offloading of these physics calculations to their PPU hardware.

14 February 2008 - PhysX Being Ported To CUDA - 10 Comments
Is NVIDIA Buying AGEIA Good For Linux?

It was announced this afternoon in a laconic press release that NVIDIA will be acquiring AGEIA Technologies. AGEIA is the company behind the PhysX SDK and their Physics Processing Unit (PPU). NVIDIA's hopes for this acquisition is to offer GeForce graphics cards in the future that are packed with PhysX technology for in-game physics rendering and is a complement technology to NVIDIA's CUDA. CUDA is NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture for writing algorithmic code to be executed on the GPU with its massively parallel capabilities.

4 February 2008 - Share Your Thoughts In The Forums - 7 Comments
NVIDIA Releases Two OSS Driver Updates

We're still working on finding out more details on NVIDIA's open-source strategy, but in minor open-source news, there are two updates now available for the xf86-video-nv (a.k.a. "nv") driver. The xf86-video-nv 2.1.7 update is for those using X.Org 7.2 or later, while xf86-video-nv 2.0.3 is for pre-X11R72. The nv 2.1.7 driver update adds support for the GeForce 8800GT and Quadro FX 3700, improved load detection, and a couple of fixes. The 2.0.3 release has a few more changes back-ported from the xf86-video-nv 2.1 series, including new GeForce 8 desktop/mobile product support. The release announcement made by Aaron Plattner can be read on the X.Org mailing list.

25 January 2008 - xf86-video-nv 2.1.7 and 2.0.3 - 7 Comments
NVIDIA Plotting Open-Source Strategy?

According to an AIB partner, NVIDIA is planning an open-source counterattack against ATI/AMD. Since this past September, AMD has been increasingly open-source friendly with their Novell partnership to deliver the RadeonHD driver and releasing open specifications. We have received information that NVIDIA is reportedly planning an increased open-source presence. Does this mean a cleaner "nv" driver? Open specifications? Jointly working with the Nouveau developers? Open sourcing part(s) of their blob? It's not known just yet.

10 January 2008 - AMD vs. NVIDIA Open-Source Battle - 34 Comments
NVClock 0.8 Beta 3 Released, Fan Fix

For those impacted by the 100% fan speed bug present in the NVIDIA 169.07 Linux driver, there is now a community fix for this problem. NVClock 0.8 Beta 3 has been released, which (among other changes) addresses this driver bug. The major changes in NVClock 0.8 Beta 3, since it's Beta 2 release in July 2006 is GeForce 8 support, rewritten low-level GeForce 6/7 overclocking back-end, added BIOS PLL table parsing for the GeForce 6/7/8 generations, GeForce 7 AGP support, NV-CONTROL OpenGL settings, and GeForce 6 bug-fixes for pipeline modding and faking the Quadro. NVClock 0.8 Beta 3 can be downloaded from its project web-page.

5 January 2008 - Includes A Fix For The 100% Fan Bug - 5 Comments
NVClock: Is This NVIDIA Utility Dead?

Prior to NVIDIA porting CoolBits over to Linux back in 2005, the only way to overclock your NVIDIA graphics card was using NVClock. NVClock has been developed as a third-party open-source utility by Roderick Colenbrander and hosted at SourceForge and LinuxHardware.org. NVClock is accessible via the command-line as well as Qt and GTK interfaces. In addition to just overclocking the core and memory frequencies on NVIDIA graphics cards, NVClock also allows for some graphics cards to do pipeline soft-modding, enabling temperature sensors that have been disabled, OpenGL tweaks, and fan-speed adjustment. However, it looks like this project has faded away and that we may never see the final release of NVClock v0.8.

13 November 2007 - Is NVClock Dead? - 1 Comment
NVIDIA NV50 Fixes For Nouveau Driver

In addition to sharing that we are approaching a point in the Nouveau development where a stable 2D release with EXA and X-Video support is in sight, the Nouveau Companion 30 also mentioned that the NV50 work is "seriously understaffed." Fortunately though, today there were nine git commits for the xf86-video-nouveau driver that improve the state of open-source NV50 support. These commits include code cleanups for the NV50, a new wrapper, and a few renamed functions. You can checkout the latest Nouveau source-code from the git repository at FreeDesktop.org.

10 November 2007 - Nine NV50 Nouveau Commits Today - Add A Comment
NVIDIA's ESA Standard For Linux?

Yesterday NVIDIA had introduced their Enthusiast System Architecture, or ESA for short, which is designed to be an "open" technology geared for computer enthusiasts to monitor and control in real-time various PC components. NVIDIA hopes that ESA will become an industry standard for real-time monitoring and controlling of such devices as PC power supplies, motherboards, and even water cooling systems (along with many more PC peripherals). A number of companies, such as Dell and ASUS, have already pledged to adopt this standard. Among the many variables that you'll be able to keep track of through the "Enthusiast System Architecture" are internal air-flow dynamics, voltage/current fluctuations for power supplies, and adjusting the pump speed for a water cooling system. This royalty-free standard is built closely around the USB HID class specification, but will NVIDIA be supporting the Enthusiast System Architecture on Linux?

6 November 2007 - Enthusiast System Architecture - 1 Comment

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